Gracious

gracious

Here’s a little bridge between my last post and the upcoming workshop in Israel I’ll be leading in a couple weeks. Perhaps it’s interesting for those who follow, consciously or not, the various interweaving threads of themes that we can sometimes perceive in the timing and placement of events around us.

I like this conversation for a lot of reasons. Some for the range and intelligence in subjects touched upon. But mostly for the overflowing humanness in presence and engagement — humbleness, kindness, wit and uplifting humor, genuine affection and respect, and personal authenticity. Graciousness. It’s an excellent example of what I’ve referred to on this blog and elsewhere as “a real conversation.”

A few phrases I’m particularly fond of, which just naturally show up…

“I’ve found it’s best not to name a relationship.”

“I don’t recommend this as a spiritual exercise. But if it does happen to you, a lot of important information is delivered to your heart.”

First of all there was the psychic catastrophe, when the contract between people began to disintegrate.”

“The real weapons of mass destruction are the hardened hearts of humanity.”

“I recognize, in a fraternal sense, that a course correction is urgent and indicated.”

“There are times in our history when we have found the ability to change, in very significant ways, as a result of hope and by projecting our moral imagination into the future.”

And here’s a beautifully designed and rendered song of Leonard Cohen, also touching on graciousness…

4 Comments Add yours

  1. original comment says:

    “Just read your blog and absolutely love this. So much packed into a ten minute conversation, which just reminds me how much you can make happen in such a brief time if your heart and mind are rising, meeting the demands and possibilities of a real moment.” R.R.

  2. original comment says:

    “There can be so much static in my daily life. I think I used to live amidst that static constantly without even realizing it. More and more I am aware of it and search for a handhold, tunnel or breath to lead me out of it, either by dropping below it or finding some way to climb up out of it. Even just reading this blog and the ones preceding immediately clear any static, calm my breathing, and transport me back to Life itself. This interview is so nourishing, and it’s placement amidst your previous posts, really concretely inspire, teach and yes, nourish by example. All these examples of “Transparent, unpretentious, genuine presence and care is all that anyone and anything really needs,” and the invitation for more “Solvitur Ambulando” both concretely and metaphorically in my own life…” K.S.

  3. Jade Wood says:

    “I don’t recommend this as a spiritual exercise. But if it does happen to you, a lot of important information is delivered to your heart.”

    This is my favourite. The one that represents the most gracious.

    This is a song for you about gracious :

  4. Mihai says:

    There are little affectionate, vulnerable exchanges, in the first video, that bring calm. I was “compelled” to watch it several times just to absorb their delightful subtlety. What most strikes me about Leonard Cohen is his (probably well practiced) capacity to find inner resolution.

    At some point the host insists on the return from the monastery. It’s as if his real question is “How can you reach resolution with such difficult matters?” Which I think Cohen understands and proceeds to show how to do it. First meeting him and the tension the question creates with “pesky little detail” and then humorously smoothening the host’s attempts to return to tension, until laughter fills the room and a subtle understanding is reached.

    Also enjoyable is that the lack of inner conflict leaves space for ceremony, quite rare in interactions.

    There is a sense of mastery that lies behind humor and humility. A beautiful surprise to randomly find on a Friday afternoon, compelled, again, by a little attention given to graciousness.

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